Trout Unlimited
NAUGATUCK/POMPERAUG CHAPTER 281 NEWSREEL

APRIL - 2016

Publisher: Cathy Unger
Contributors: Bob Gregorski, Ernie Ludwig

Ernie Ludwig  | Vice President  |                            
203-560-2053 | www.tunaugpomp.org | www.tu.org
Tungsten BH Czech Mate Nymph - Hare's Ear                                                                    


Meetings are held at ION's Community Center Building at 270 CHURCH Street, Naugatuck, CT. The ION Bank Community center building located next to the YMCA which is just up the street from where we originally held our last meeting in June. The building is to the left side when facing the YMCA. There is plenty of parking on the opposite side in the parking lot.

Meeting, Wednesday, April 6, 2016


Bob Gregorski

The OPENING DAY of the 2016 inland fishing season is April 9. If you haven’t started getting prepared for the first day, here are some suggestions. In the coming weeks, other tips will follow regarding fishing and boating/paddling equipment.

Fishing Reel Maintenance
Most anglers will not fish until Opening Day. A few fraternities, each of which targets a specific species, will be out before that day pursuing white perch, walleye, pike, striped bass, black bass, tautog, trout including sea-runs and yellow perch as weather and outdoor conditions allow. But most of the pleasant-weather anglers stopped angling last summer or fall. Their equipment perhaps in poor to fair condition remains where they left it. That is if they can remember where it is. Fishing reels and lines take the greatest abuse during the fishing seasons and while in storage. This particularly true if the equipment was used in marine waters. Fishing reels can be the most expensive piece of angling equipment that needs continual maintenance. The next several weeks are a good time to get those reels and lines out of storage and inspect them.

I started my annual reel maintenance last week. Most avid anglers who fish freshwater and saltwater may use a variety of equipment as I do (trolling, spin casting, fly casting and surf casting). Reels and lines get the most abused by the elements and anglers. If saltwater reels are not washed and lubricated properly after use in marine waters they can be ruined.

When I purchase a new reel, I make a point to save the booklet that came with it. The manufacturer’s maintenance guidelines should be followed. This is particularly important with the drag system. Cleaning and/or lubricating a drag improperly may ruin it. The manufacturer of each reel supplies information about the care and maintenance of it. Follow the manufacture's recommendation.

The following are general guidelines for most reels. After removing the line, wash the exterior surfaces. I use a mild soap and warm water. Inspect the external parts for scrapes on the finish, wear, loose or worn parts and damage. Line rollers and guides should be smooth. Bail return springs, drag knobs, level wind guides should operate smoothly. Clean, then lubricate.

Before taking a reel apart, I get a small box that has sides about 1-2 inches high that the reel will fit inside with room to spare. That way all the parts remain in one location, and it minimizes making a mess with grease and oil. Then get the appropriate size Phillips or flat head screwdrivers and nut drivers, a few cotton swabs, pipe cleaners, tiny stiff paint brushes, clean cloths, paper towels, reel grease and oil.

Disassemble the reel following the manufacturer's schematic. If you don't have it, make notes about how it came apart. Take an images of various views of the reel. Keep every part in the box. Trust me. This is particularly important for drag washers. They have to be put back in the proper order. Clean all the grime, sand and whatever from the internal workings using cotton swabs, pipe cleaners or tiny, paint brushes. I wipe off whatever I can, then spray some silicon on the appropriate parts and then do a thorough cleaning. I no longer use kerosene to remove old grease. It’s flammable and smells. Never use gasoline.

After all parts are spotless, lubricate according to the manufacturer's instructions. Put the line on only after it has been checked and after all the cleaning and lubricating has been done. Some anglers spray the entire reel with WD-40 or silicon to give it a protective coating. It may not be a wise thing to do if the ingredients may damage the line. Reel protectors/covers are a good thing to use. An old sock can do the job. I keep a record of when the reel was cleaned and lubed and place a sticker with the date and pound test; my fly reels are marked with date, line type and weight.

A good practice for all reels is to wash and dry them after each use and keep them in a reel case. If a reel is dropped in sand/soil, it should be washed clean immediately. If a reel gets dunked in saltwater, it should be rinsed in warm freshwater ASAP. Keep your reels in good shape and they will last a long time. My Mitchell 300, which I bought second hand in 1955, is still cranking.


Prepare Your Lines for OPENING DAY Bob Gregorski

"I succumb seasonally to this spell and can recognize the symptoms in others. The obsession is recurrent, and I know of no cure for it. For its duration, fishing seems more important than anything else." – Sly MacDowell

Fishing Lines
If you haven’t started getting prepared for Opening Day of the freshwater season, or fishing the TMA’s or marine waters soon, here’s are a few suggestions about fishing lines

Fly lines should be cleaned before being dressed. Soaking a line in the kitchen sink in a bath of warm soapy water works. After a soaking, pull the line through a paper towel. The grime will show on the towel. Soak more if necessary. Then dress the line if needed.

Spinning, trolling and casting lines should be checked for strength. The covering on trolling lines should be checked for fraying and strength and wire lines for knots and kinks. Spinning and casting lines used for one season or more should be changed. To save money some anglers replace only the section that gets used and abused. However if you will be pursuing trophy-size fish it's a good practice to replace the entire line. Don't replace the line until the reel has been cleaned and lubricated. Fishing reels can be the most expensive piece of angling equipment that needs continual maintenance.

In the coming weeks, other tips will follow regarding fishing and boating/paddling equipment.
"I succumb seasonally to this spell and can recognize the symptoms in others. The obsession is recurrent, and I know of no cure for it. For its duration, fishing seems more important than anything else." – Sly MacDowell

Don’t wait until OPENING DAY to check all your equipment. Do it now! Locate your rods, lures, and flies, check your waders, other needed equipment and supplies.


These Naugatuck High School Junior ROTC cadets paint bluebird houses which they constructed. This project was subsidized by N-P TU.

L-R
Grace Santiago
Dan Solberg
Joe Taveras
Charles Santanelli
Arshil Chowdhury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L-R (at the table)
Inline image
Kevin Pimpinelli
Justin Lastra
David Roskosky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


And speaking of new members, do you know any women who enjoy our sport, conservation or both? Well, TU is interested in attracting more women to the organization and for a limited time is offering women free memberships. 

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs138/1108742089399/img/31.jpgPlease feel free to share this information with any women anglers or conservationists you might now. Let's all work to expand our influence.

 

 


  Membership Renewals:
Recent changes have been made to TU's policy toward membership renewals. Individual chapters no longer receive a portion of each renewal. As such, please send renewals directly to TU national or renew on the web site.

Trout Unlimited's Mission

To conserve, protect and restore North America's cold water fisheries and their watershed.